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I received your book and it is a delight. It's so meticulous. Thank you for this memento ... Madeleine Stowe

Guide book STILL Available - Order Now! 

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... The Ninth Dispatch

 

Book will examine war hero's life, death

courtesy of Matthew Sturdevant/The Post Star, Glens Falls

The famed hero of the French-Indian War resorted to cannibalism once and, on a separate occasion, he was freed from prison by a band of drunken, ax-toting Redcoats, according to a biographer of Robert Rogers.

Robert Rogers was a swashbuckling marauder whose life took him all over the globe during the 18th century, and adventurous chaos seemed to follow, according to historian and illustrator Gary Stephen Zaboly of the Bronx.

Zaboly has been commissioned to write a biography of Robert Rogers by a Long Island man, Frank Nastasi, who owns a portion of Rogers Island, which is named for Rogers. The nearly 800-page book is expected to be on store shelves in a year and a half.

Zaboly and Nastasi have traveled all over the eastern half of the United States, to Scotland and to Ireland, searching for information about Rogers.

The two men have studied Rogers' life for about 30 years and have conflicting views about where he died and where he is buried.

Rogers is famous for using Indian guerrilla tactics to fight the French and their Indian allies in the French & Indian War, Zaboly said.

Later, when he remained loyal to England during the Revolution, he was ordered imprisoned by George Washington in 1776 on charges that he was a Loyalist spy.

Zaboly found written notes telling that Rogers had been freed in a prison break, along with all of the other inmates.

"About a hundred Redcoats stormed the jailhouse with bayonets and axes," Zaboly said. "They went through New York in a drunken rampage. ... It was like an old western movie."

On a separate occasion, in what is now St. Francis, Quebec, Rogers' men were starving when they found a plump, Indian squaw that they killed and ate, Zaboly said. Written notes about the incident indicate that Rogers felt some shame about resorting to cannibalism.

Rogers lived in poverty in London at the end of his life in the 1790s.

Other books about Rogers claim he's buried in a lot that was destroyed by German bombs during World War II and later made into a paved park. But Nastasi said Rogers might be buried in the Dunbarton Cemetery in Bow, N.H., near the remains of his older brother, Samuel, across the street from where their childhood home stood in the 1730s.

Nastasi went back to the cemetery for a second time in May of this year, and through ground-penetrating radar, found an unmarked grave, 3-1/2 feet deep, in the middle of the cemetery. He requested permission from the trustees of the cemetery to probe again, but they said no.

Zaboly thinks Rogers is buried overseas.

"Personally, I think his remains are in England because he was banned from coming back to New Hampshire," Zaboly said. "It kind of doesn't make sense that the locals would allow him to be buried in New Hampshire when he was considered a Loyalist. But who knows?"

A Report Of An Incursion Into French Canada, August, 2002

Montreal is about 150 miles north of Fort William Henry on Lake George. I had known for some time that the French  were celebrating their 18th century “Market Days” and fur fair in the latter part of August and I wanted to take part in it

The Museum of Archaeology at Pointe a’ Calliere which hosts the event sits directly on the exact spot of the founding of Montreal. It is where Maisonneuve, Jeanne Mance and their companions landed to plant the French flag in May of 1642. It is also the spot where I stepped ashore into crowds of habitants, soldiers and allied Indians. I had no idea of how I would be received and so I (nervously) waded into the noise, color and excitement of the fair.

When I was eventually recognized as an “Anglais”, I was brought before directors at the headquarters of the museum. To my relief, I was given every consideration and a most unexpected and gracious welcome!

I urge all who seek a unique 18th century experience to attend the Fair next August. For further info: www.pacmuseum.qc.ca.

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CAPTIONS
Top to Bottom - L to R

  • Les Amerindiens Montagnais

  • Place Royale - On the spot of the founding of Montreal

  • Monsieur Deni Blanchet [r] and his secretary [l]

  • Tim's better half, Diane, & friend

  • Francine Labrosse on the Musee de Archaeology - Point A Calliere

  • Padre Rene-Charles de Breslay [center] & Payson Pierre Laliberte [r]

  • A few of the dozens of market stalls in the "Old Town"

  • Children were able to "dress up" courtesy of the Musee de Archaeology

  • Street musicians

  • A ceremony at Place Royale

~~~~~~~

Saratoga 225th Battle Anniversary October 12, ‘02

I have been attending reenactments for 26 years. I have never seen anything like the recreated Battle Of Saratoga. Thousands of troops in correct formations, cavalry, cannon and the sounds of battle left no doubt that we were experiencing the 18th century event in the truest sense.

For more new photos and info on the event please go to www.saratoga225th.org   Click into “New Photos”   --It will knock your stockings off!

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CAPTIONS
Top to Bottom - L to R

  • Benedict Arnold [on horse] reviews American troops going into battle

  • British troops parade before surrender

  • American troops marching into battle - note Domine [Preacher] praying for the men [center left]

  • American dragoons

  • More troops of the American right

  • The American right marching into battle - over 1,000 strong

  • The American left - over 1,000 strong

  • Aftermath of battle - one of the hospital tents

~~~~~~~

The Fort At Number 4, October 6th and 26th 2002

Anyone with an interest in The Last Of  The Mohicans and the time period in which it takes place should note our weather. I have included pictures of a visit to No. 4 on October 6th and again on October 26th.  In 20 days we went from late summer to miserable winter. Coming across and over the Green Mountain  highlands of Vermont on the 26th was an abrupt introduction to early winter.

Fort Number 4 (The 4th plantation along the upper Connecticut river valley) was actually a fortified village. It was under attack throughout the French & Indian war of 1746-1749 and was a prominent northern post in the last French war 1755-1760. It was to Number 4 that Rogers returned after his famous raid on the Canadian Indian village of St. Francis.

Fort Number 4 is as close to a real frontier colonial experience as you can get. Please view the site on the internet: www.fortat4.org

Views of Fort at #4

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CAPTIONS [lower set]
Top to Bottom - L to R

  • The Great Chamber & South Gate

  • Same view ... 20 days later

  • It's hard to shake off the cold of an early first snow

  • John Soule - a most gracious host of Fort #4 - and his wife

  • Staying close to the fire

  • Captain John Stark [r]

  • Collecting kindling

  • no caption available 

~~~~~~~

My warmest regards to all, Tim Cordell
November 10, 2002
[whose smiling face can be seen gracing several of these pics ... R.F]

 

A documentary film
called the Battle on Snowshoes has been recently completed. The film should be of interest seeing as how it was shot in the Lake George and Champlain Valley using
reenactors. It also features interviews with George Bray [This Site's Historian], Tim Todish, Bob
Bearor and Ed Dodge.

Catch a sneak peek at:

ENJOY!

A Hidden Gem

courtesy of the Fort

The past comes alive at the Fort at No. 4! Travel back in time to the 1740's. Have an unforgettable experience in the authentic reconstruction of the 1744 settlement of Charlestown, New Hampshire. Tour with guides dressed as the original settlers of No. 4 as they take you through the gates of our heritage. Demonstrations of hearth cooking, musket firings, military drill and much more are conducted daily.

The No. 4 Township was first settled by families from Massachusetts and was the northwestern most English-speaking village in New England. The isolation of this community made it vulnerable to attack by French and Indians during their wars with Britain! The settlers turned their town into a Fort. This important piece of history has been rebuilt, for the entire family to experience & enjoy.

The Fort at No. 4 recreates life of the eastern frontier during the French & Indian War Era. Within the log stockade are province houses, lean-tos, a Great Hall and watch tower. Outside the palisade walls are a working blacksmith shop and two 18th century barns.

Come, visit our furnished province houses; special exhibits are featured in the lean-to buildings; our costumed staff will bring to life the spirit of Number Four. Skills of the time are demonstrated daily.

Getting There

Located on Route 11 approximately one mile north of the village of Charlestown; one-half mile south of the Springfield, VT-Charlestown, NH exit No. 7 off I-91. Open daily, Memorial Day Weekend through late October.

Hours: The Fort is open daily, Thursday through Monday, June 5th until Oct. 31st.
Hours are 10am to 4:30pm in the Fort, 10am to 5pm in the Gift Shop

Contacts

Telephone: 603-826-5700
 or 1-800-367-8284

Web Site: http://www.fortat4.com/

E-mail:
 
info@fortat4.com

Address: Fort at No. 4 Living History Museum
Springfield Road, RT 11
Post Office Box 1336
Charlestown, NH 03603

Admission is charged. Group and School tours may be arranged by appointment!

The Fort at No. 4 is a private, non-profit corporation.

 

OTHER COURIER DISPATCHES:

ON THE SCENE AT FORT WILLIAM HENRY

LAKE GEORGE/FORT AREA MAP & WALKING TOUR

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... FIRST DISPATCH

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... SECOND DISPATCH

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... THIRD DISPATCH

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... FOURTH DISPATCH

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... FIFTH DISPATCH

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... SIXTH DISPATCH

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... SEVENTH DISPATCH

FROM THE RAMPARTS ... EIGHTH DISPATCH

 ORIGINAL TIM CORDELL ART GALLERY 

ORIGINAL TIM CORDELL HISTORICAL FICTION:

See a relic from the bottom of Lake George!

FOR A DETAILED LOOK AT SOME OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL WORK AT FORT WILLIAM HENRY- AND OTHER F&I WAR SITES - GO TO:

CONTACT:

SEE ALSO:

FORT WILLIAM HENRY ... The Siege & Massacre

FORT WILLIAM HENRY ... Digging for Clues

DEATH OF LORD HOWE

New book on Fort William Henry!

 

 

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